Data presented at the 2017 AFFECT Reception

  • Data presented included statistics based on AFA data, on NBER data, and on keynotes.
  • The first key take-away is that there is a steady decrease in the representation of women, from the entry student level to the most prestigious NBER appointees and keynote speakers.
  • The second key take-away, based on an analysis of cites, is that there are many qualified women who are less recognized for potential high-level roles.
  • These trends suggest that policies aimed at increasing female representation at the top of the profession should direct their focus on the existing graduates and junior faculty. It is imperative to reduce the leaky-pipeline effect, both to increase women’s representation into the profession and to attract more women to the profession. Attempting to increase female representation at the PhD level without addressing the leaky-pipeline effect is likely to have limited results.
  • Click here for a more detailed summary of results, as well as the full powerpoint presentation.
 Summary graph for website

Survey at the 2015 FMA Women’s Networking Breakfast

  • The majority of the women in attendance had a tenured or tenure-track faculty position. There were also some PhD students and some women with research positions in non-academic institutions (for example, the FED).
  • The first key take-away is that the vast majority of women feel that women face more difficulties than men in obtaining tenure, a sentiment that is supported by related research in economics.
  • Second, women face many constraints, which affect conference attendance.
  • Third, most women find it relatively easy to talk to people and network, after getting an introduction, suggesting that the benefits of attending more conference would be large.
  • Fourth, women tend to spend more time on committee or other university service, compared to professional service that is related to research.
  • Full results can be found here.
A few figures:
  • The vast majority of women feel that women face more difficulties than men in obtaining tenure, a sentiment that is supported by related research in economics.

constraints

  • Women face many constraints, which affect conference attendance.

conf attendance

  • Most women find it relatively easy to talk to people and network, after getting an introduction, suggesting that the benefits of attending more conference would be large.

network

  • Women tend to spend more time on committee or other university service, compared to professional service that is related to research.

service_univ service_prof